Kritik

A public forum on theory, culture, and politics hosted by the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

touching hands against a space background
Ashli Anda (PhD Candidate in Philosophy)
On Tuesday October 25, 2022, Professor Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández (Toronto) delivered “The Pedagogies of Solidarity,” a lecture about understanding and developing pedagogies of solidarity. Quoted content is from the lecture unless noted otherwise. All images are by 愚木混株 Cdd20 from Pixabay. Rubén...
<Reform or Revolution and Other Writings https://www.amazon.com/Revolution-Writings-History-Political-Science/dp/0486447766> with an introduction by Paul Buhle written by Rosa Luxemburg in 1899 (published by Dover Books in 2006).
Katie Worrall (PhD Student in Political Science)
In her lecture titled “Marxism, Imperialism and the Beyond of Capitalism: Re-reading Rosa Luxemburg” Amy Allen implores scholars to move beyond the developmental arc of history, a theory of history borrowed from Karl Marx that Luxemburg embeds in her idea of the beyond of capitalism. Allen wants to understand what Luxemburg means by the beyond or outside of capitalism that is present in many of her writings. She centers the project within a larger scholarly project on Marx’s theory of history and 20th-century Marxist thinkers. Allen situates her lecture as a critique of Rosa Luxemburg amid...
Hans Holbein the Younger, “The Ambassadors,” 1533, National Gallery, London.
Jamie Keener (PhD student in English)
On October 11, 2022, Cameron McCarthy spoke at the Unit for Criticism on “The Postcolonial Imagination: Tools for Conviviality.” Beginning with his own high school education in Barbados, McCarthy used the school’s entrance examination system and literary curriculum—both determined in England and centered on an English canon—as an entry point into his broader questions about postcolonial art and aesthetics. He defined postcolonial theory as the “practices of systematic reflection on dominant relations, produced in the process of elaboration of colonial and neocolonial relationships and...
“State Names” by Jaune Quick-To-See-Smith
Emerson Parker Pehl (Ph.D. Student, English), enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma
On September 27th, Dr. Rosalyn LaPier (History UIUC), an enrolled member of the Blackfeet Tribe of Montana and Métis, delivered a Modern Critical Theory lecture entitled “Land as Text: Environmental Studies.” While “Indigenous” and “Native” are globalized terms, due to the scope of this blog post they are invoked throughout to primarily refer to those people, communities, and tribal nations Indigenous to Turtle Island. Through her education in dual Western and Indigenous knowledge systems, LaPier illustrated how the...
urban theory lab
Sayak Roy (PhD Student in Landscape Architecture)
On September 20, 2022, Professor David Wilson (GGIS) delivered a Modern Critical Theory lecture entitled "The Advanced Capitalist City: Conceptual Innovations." David Wilson's articulation of the advanced capitalist city engaged with various important contemporary discourses via an investigation of the nexus of cities, people, and personal and scholarly experiences which shaped his scholarship as an urban geographer. Urban studies scholarship understands "capitalist cities" through Neo-classical, institutional, Neo-Marxist, hermeneutic, post-modern, and post-structural frameworks of...
Love in the Time of Greed and Gods
Debayudh Chatterjee [PhD student, English (Literary Studies)]
Suman Mukhopadhyay, the eminent film director and thespian from West Bengal, India, screened his latest release Nazarband (Captive/2020), a loose cinematic adaption of a short story by Ashapurna Devi, at Temple Hoyne Buell Hall on 15th September 2022. This Hindi film tracks the trajectories of two convicts, Vasanti Mahato (Indira Tiwari) and Chandu (Tanmay Dhanania), shortly after being freed from incarceration. Together, despite initial hiccups, they traverse the length and breadth of Kolkata and its hinterlands, to seek a new start, or perhaps a reunion with the past. The screening...
Piano
Adrian Wong (PhD Student in the Institute of Communications Research)
The trio ebb and flow through timbral scenes as if incessantly daydreaming across an eternal triptych, each panel briefly made visible by rumbling left-hand (LH) piano texturing arpeggios beneath transparent open fourths, fifths, and octaves in nightingales. Contrabass bowed tremolo glissandi converge with metal brushes on drum in a white noise of resonance. But these are not just any scenes. They make a place where there is no space, where there is no room for you. And maybe by making place, they also produce “being-with.” Their sounds are less music making than world-making, hybrid worlds...
A map of the Indo-Pacific from a Council on Foreign Relations article on “Indo-Pacific Strategy.” Source: https://www.cfr.org/expert-brief/us-indo-pacific-strategy-needs-more-indian-ocean
Claire Baytaş (PhD Student in Comparative & World Literature)
The Asian America Otherwise Conference was the culminating conference of the In Plain Sight: Reckoning with Anti-Asian Racism research initiative. This initiative was funded by the Chancellor’s Call to Action to Address Racism & Social Injustice Research Program for 2021-2022. In Plain Sight has included a series of public lectures and seminars featuring leading scholars in Asian American studies and related fields. The Asian America Otherwise Conference took place May 6-7, 2022 at the I Hotel in Champaign.             The conference’s first panel, “Other Politics,...
Headshot of Cathy Park Hong
Jamie Keener (PhD Student in English)
The third event of the year-long series, “In Plain Sight: Reckoning with Anti-Asian Racism,” co-organized by the Unit for Criticism and the Department of Asian American Studies, took place on Tuesday, March 22, 2022. Cathy Park Hong (Rutgers), author of Minor Feelings: An Asian American Reckoning, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award and Pulitzer Prize finalist, spoke to Susan Koshy (UIUC) and Soo Ah Kwon (UIUC)....
The UN Secretariat building under construction in New York City in 1949
Hyeree Ellis (PhD Student in English)
On Friday, February 4, 2022, Professors Roderick Ferguson (Yale), Mishuana Goeman (UCLA), Viet Thanh Nguyen (USC), and Alfonso Gonzalez Toribio (UCR) kicked off “Making It Plain: Articulating Our Racist Present,” the first event in the year-long series “In Plain Sight: Reckoning with Anti-Asian Racism,” organized by the Unit for Criticism and the Department of Asian American Studies. As a panel of four, the professors took turns offering one to three key terms critical to setting up a wide-angle view of racism and anti-racist politics today. Drawing on the wide...