Connecting across campus

Photo of an urban city, perspective

The Poststructuralist City

This seminar explores the complexity of cities and urbanization across the globe as evolving and turbulent landscapes. We will engage a multiplicity of cities in our readings and discussion, e.g., Chicago, Los Angeles, London, Cape Town, Mumbai, St. Louis, Detroit, Berlin, Mexico City, and Jakarta. We examine the swath of current economic, political, cultural, and social forces that are constituting and reverberating across cities in current global and neoliberal times.

GGIS 594

Picture of bark

Oddkin: Rethinking Relations in Indigenous Literary and Visual Texts

In “How Do We Behave as Good Relatives?” Daniel Heath Justice writes about “making kin as oddkin […] where the range of relatives to whom we are responsible extends far beyond our biological relatives and, indeed, the category of the human itself.” This practice of “making oddkin” serves as centerpiece of this seminar, which turns to literary and visual texts by Indigenous artists whose work sees the human as thoroughly imbricated in more-than-human worlds—and indeed, challenges the coherence of such categories altogether.

AIS 503

Black and white photo of scales of justice

Law and Society

This course discusses major issues and debates in the fields of law and society and socio-legal studies. This course covers the theory and practice of legal and political institutions in performing several major functions at the local, national, and transnational levels, such as: allocating authority, enabling social control, defining relationships, resolving conflict, adapting to social change, and fostering social solidarity.

SOC 596

Image of rows of books

Politics, Knowledge & Evidence

This course will explore Political ideas and ideologies of evidence; Evidence and the politics of knowledge; Claims as evidence and evidence as knowledge; Knowledge and privilege; and Jurisprudential debates.

ANTH 515

Photo of Marcel Proust

Marcel Proust

Seminar on Marcel Proust's multivolume novel A la recherche du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time, 1913-1927). Readings include excerpts from each volume of the novel and related critical texts from approaches including genetic criticism, digital humanities, Jewish and queer studies, philosophy, art history, musicology, and cognitive theory. Taught in French; seminar discussions will be conducted in French or English; students from graduate programs other than French Studies are welcome to read the novel in English.

FR 578

Block Reference

Unit for Criticism News

Read article: Nicholson Fellowship 2024 Awarded to Kei Kato and Tai Wakabayashi
Nicholson Fellowship 2024 Awarded to Kei Kato and Tai Wakabayashi
Kei Kato (PhD student, Geography) and Taisuke L. Wakabayashi (PhD student, Landscape Architecture) have been awarded 2024 Nicholson Fellowship to attend School of Criticism and Theory at Cornell University.  In an intensive six-week course of study,...
Read article: Faculty Affiliate David Wilson Receives Lifetime Achievement Honor from the Association of American Geographers
Faculty Affiliate David Wilson Receives Lifetime Achievement Honor from the Association of American Geographers
David Wilson has been appointed as a lifetime American Association of Geographers Fellow for his meaningful contributions to the discipline of geography. Professor Wilson, with appointments in geography, urban planning, and the Unit for Criticism and Interpretive Theory at Illinois Urbana-Champaign...
Read article: Helga Varden's Work, Sex, Love, and Gender, Receives North American Kant Society's Senior Scholar Prize
Helga Varden's Work, Sex, Love, and Gender, Receives North American Kant Society's Senior Scholar Prize
  Helga Varden’s Sex,Love, and Gender...

Unit for Criticism Events

Title
Land Acknowledgement

Body

We acknowledge that we are on the homelands of the Peoria, Kaskaskia, Piankashaw, Wea, Miami, Mascoutin, Odawa, Sauk, Mesquaki, Kickapoo, Potawatomi, Ojibwe, and Chickasaw Nations. We honor these ancestral grounds as the traditional territory of these Native Nations prior to their forced removal. As members of a land-grant institution, we are obligated to know the histories of dispossession that have allowed the University of Illinois to grow. We must acknowledge and reflect on colonialism as an active crisis and address the role that this university has played in it. The centering of Native peoples is merely a start in committing to undoing the erasure of Native voices, histories, and futures. We have a responsibility to decolonize this institution and our communities, to raise consciousness about indigenous sovereignty, and to act in ways that bring about justice. 

Donate to the Native American House at the University of Illinois.

Image courtesy of Waab-Shki-Makoons (Clayton Samuel King), a multimedia artist living in Ontario, Canada. He is of Bodewadmi (Potawatomi) Anishinabek and Chi Mookomaan descent and is a member of Beausoleil First Nation, otherwise known as Chimnissing. Nookmis and the Water Beings is acrylic on canvas.